A new theory suggests that the birth of the Universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris.The standard theory is that the Universe grew from an infinitely dense point or singularity. The standard Big Bang model tells us that the Universe exploded out of an infinitely dense point, or singularity. But it is not known what triggered this outburst. Now, it is proposed that the Big Bang was mirage from collapsing higher-dimensional star.
In a paper posted last week, Afshordi (an astrophysicist at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics) and his colleagues turn their attention to a proposal made in 2000. In that model, our three-dimensional (3D) Universe is a membrane, or brane, that floats through a ‘bulk universe’ that has four spatial dimensions.
Ashfordi’s team realized that if the bulk universe contained its own four-dimensional (4D) stars, some of them could collapse, forming 4D black holes in the same way that massive stars in our Universe do: they explode as supernovae, violently ejecting their outer layers, while their inner layers collapse into a black hole. When Afshordi’s team modelled the death of a 4D star, they found that the ejected material would form a 3D brane surrounding that 3D event horizon, and slowly expand.

A new theory suggests that the birth of the Universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris.

The standard theory is that the Universe grew from an infinitely dense point or singularity. The standard Big Bang model tells us that the Universe exploded out of an infinitely dense point, or singularity. But it is not known what triggered this outburst. Now, it is proposed that the Big Bang was mirage from collapsing higher-dimensional star.

In a paper posted last week, Afshordi (an astrophysicist at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics) and his colleagues turn their attention to a proposal made in 2000. In that model, our three-dimensional (3D) Universe is a membrane, or brane, that floats through a ‘bulk universe’ that has four spatial dimensions.

Ashfordi’s team realized that if the bulk universe contained its own four-dimensional (4D) stars, some of them could collapse, forming 4D black holes in the same way that massive stars in our Universe do: they explode as supernovae, violently ejecting their outer layers, while their inner layers collapse into a black hole. When Afshordi’s team modelled the death of a 4D star, they found that the ejected material would form a 3D brane surrounding that 3D event horizon, and slowly expand.

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