malformalady:

Australian scientists have developed a pair of anti-shark wetsuits that make divers appear invisible by camouflaging their bodies in the sea and trick sharks into thinking surfers are poisonous. A team of researchers from the University of Western Australia joined forces with designers from  Shark Attack Mitigation Systems (SAMS) to create the suits. The blue pattern of the Elude suit can’t be seen by the shark because the fish are colour blind. While the stripes on the Diverter suit mimic the colours of poisonous fish to warn the sharks off.

malformalady:

Australian scientists have developed a pair of anti-shark wetsuits that make divers appear invisible by camouflaging their bodies in the sea and trick sharks into thinking surfers are poisonous. A team of researchers from the University of Western Australia joined forces with designers from  Shark Attack Mitigation Systems (SAMS) to create the suits. The blue pattern of the Elude suit can’t be seen by the shark because the fish are colour blind. While the stripes on the Diverter suit mimic the colours of poisonous fish to warn the sharks off.

In the rare cases where actual psychological differences exist, they cannot be attributed to innate neurology alone. Everything in the brain is a combination of nature and nurture. Culture comes into play, which affects behavior, which then affects the brain. From birth (and even in the womb), a baby is labeled as a girl or boy and treated a certain way as a result. For example, a 2005 study of 386 birth announcements in Canadian newspapers showed that parents tend to say they’re “proud” when it’s a boy and “happy” when it’s a girl. Anne Fausto-Sterling, a biologist at Brown University, has shown that mothers talk to infant girls more than infant boys. This could partly explain why girls tend to have better language skills later on. “Some differences end up fairly entrenched in adult human beings,” Fausto-Sterling says. “But that doesn’t mean that you were born that way or that you were born destined to be that way.”

This hollow, now grown full of plants, was formed 6600 years ago when a meteorite hurtled down to a forest in South Estonia called Ilumetsa.The meteorite crater’s name is Põrguhaud – Hell’s Grave in English – and has its own folklore from ancient Estonians: “It was very dangerous to be near the place during the Midsummer time because it was on fire as the devils were drying gold there. Some, however, were brave enough to go and look among the trees despite the danger. If someone said the devil’s name around the glow of the fire, he turned into the devil servant itself.”

This hollow, now grown full of plants, was formed 6600 years ago when a meteorite hurtled down to a forest in South Estonia called Ilumetsa.
The meteorite crater’s name is Põrguhaud – Hell’s Grave in English – and has its own folklore from ancient Estonians: “It was very dangerous to be near the place during the Midsummer time because it was on fire as the devils were drying gold there. Some, however, were brave enough to go and look among the trees despite the danger. If someone said the devil’s name around the glow of the fire, he turned into the devil servant itself.”

If you have questions about me, please check the ABOUT page first.
Sci-Universe's tip jar